Categories

Bioinformatics

Who Says Bioinformaticians Don’t Have A Sense Of Humour?

I haven’t had time for a proper post for the past few days and I still don’t, but Leasey recommends that you explore the platypus genome by hovering your mouse pointer over the little image of a platypus on this page and reading the pop-up that appears. Genomics: an unrecognized mine of comedy gold.

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Babes Of Biology: No. 2

Having read an article I wrote reviewing bioinformatics courses in the UK, and despite my honest warnings, Wei applied to be a student on one I once taught on. Because the admissions office at [insert name of educational institution easily obtained by googling] failed to process her paperwork properly she had to make do with […]

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Abuse Of Power

If you are interested in biotechnology enterprise and investment in the Philippines then you need to be at this conference. [Is that okay, cs?]

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Oh Poo

I found out just before Christmas that I’ve been turned down for that SciArt grant I was applying for. This is not exactly a surprise, but I’m still not happy about it. Thankfully, my family took my hint when I told them and I didn’t have to endure a Christmas of them looking at me […]

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How Not To Get Fired For ‘Blogging

There has been a (false) fire alarm at the Genome Campus. Tens of its employees are standing outside in chilly spring rain and wind. I am joined by my boss’s boss and the senior colleague with whom he is temporarily sharing his office. My boss’s boss turns to his officemate: “Have you read Damian’s ‘Blog?” […]

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Jungle VIPs

Scientists are almost as susceptible to a certain type of urban myth as the rest of the population. One popular one was that there are 100 000 genes in the human genome. When the first estimates of “the number of genes”—I use quotes because exactly what constitutes a single gene is subtle, complex, and controversial—based on […]

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Just Like Us

Ultimately, the goal of the work I contributed to in my Master’s thesis (1996) was to find a new computational technique for examining 3-D images. With it, psychiatrists would be able to detect variations in in the structure of human brains (in something called their “torsion”) and identify schizophrenics without having to dissect their heads […]

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